Full Coverage

 Coroner: Teen in Asiana crash killed by vehicle
Story Photo

1 year ago

Coroner: Teen in Asiana crash killed by vehicle

SAN MATEO, Calif. (AP) - A coroner says a teenager in the Asiana Airlines crash was killed when she was struck by a vehicle at the scene.

San Mateo County Coroner Robert Foucrault on Friday disclosed the findings of his autopsy on 16-year-old Ye Meng Yuan, a Chinese student.

Foucralt said she died of multiple blunt injuries that are consistent with being run over by a motor vehicle. He did not say what that vehicle was.

San Francisco Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-White said officials believe the girl was struck by a specialized fire vehicle.

Authorities confirmed last week that Yuan was hit by a vehicle racing to extinguish flames that broke out on the Boeing 777.

Police said she was on the ground and covered in fire-retardant foam that rescuers had sprayed on the wreckage.

Story Photo

1 year ago

Coroner to reveal cause of Asiana passenger death

SAN MATEO, Calif. (AP) - Officials are set to reveal whether a Chinese student on board Asiana Flight 214 survived the crash-landing only to be killed accidentally on the runway by a firetruck racing to the wrecked, smoking plane.

The San Mateo County Coroner's Office will hold a news conference Friday morning to announce the cause and manner of 16-year-old Ye Meng Yuan's death.

She and her middle school classmate, 16-year-old Wang Linjia, died in the July 6 crash at San Francisco International airport. The other victim killed, 15-year-old Liu Yipeng, died at a hospital July 12. Dozens of others were injured.

Police and fire officials confirmed last week that Ye Meng Yuan was hit by a firetruck racing to extinguish the blazing Boeing 777.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

Story Photo

1 year ago

Pilot killed in plane crash was on his way to get the engine evaluated

According to the National Transportation Safety Board, the pilot killed after his plane crashed near San Luis Obispo Regional Airport was on his way to Palo Alto to have an engine problem evaluated. In a detailed report about the plane crash investigation, the NTSB released information on the condition of the plane. Friends of the pilot, 44-year-old Scott Metzger of San Luis Obispo, told investigators the airplane had been experiencing problems with the rear engine in the month leading up to the accident. Officials say Metzger left the plane at a maintenance facility at San Luis Obispo Airport about one week before the accident. There, workers found the engine was "stuttering at 2,000 rpm." They were not able to solve the engine problem, and Metzger asked that they stop working on the plane. About two weeks before the accident, Metzger had maintenance workers look at his plane in Palo Alto. Officials say he was headed back to Palo Alto to have work done on the engine when he crashed. The NTSB says this is just a preliminary report on the accident, and they are still investigating.

Story Photo

1 year ago

Hospital official: Child dies of injuries, becoming third victim of Asiana crash

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - Hospital officials say a child injured in last Saturday's Asiana Airlines crash has died, bringing the death toll to three.

Meanwhile, San Francisco fire officials say one of two Chinese girls killed in the Asiana plane crash was already dead when airport staff found her.

Fire spokesman Mindy Talmadge said on Friday that the girl, identified as 16-year-old Wang Linjia, was found along with three flight attendants near a runway seawall. Linjia was not the girl that police said was run over by a truck.

The National Transportation Safety Board says three flight attendants were flung from the back of the plane when it broke open. The attendants survived.

Linjia's friend, 16-year-old Ye Meng Yuan, was hit by the truck while covered in firefighting foam. It is not clear whether she was already dead when the collision occurred or whether the truck killed her moments after Saturday's crash.

Story Photo

1 year ago

Both girls killed in Asiana crash dead when found

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - San Francisco fire officials say one of two Chinese girls killed in the Asiana plane crash was already dead when airport staff found her.

Fire spokesman Mindy Talmadge said on Friday that the girl, identified as 16-year-old Wang Linjia, was found along with three flight attendants near a runway seawall. Linjia was not the girl that police said was run over by a truck.

The National Transportation Safety Board says three flight attendants were flung from the back of the plane when it broke open. The attendants survived.

Linjia's friend, 16-year-old Ye Meng Yuan, was hit by the truck while covered in firefighting foam. It is not clear whether she was already dead when the collision occurred or whether the truck killed her moments after Saturday's crash.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

Story Photo

1 year ago

Police: Teen in Asiana crash hit by fire truck

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - San Francisco police say one of the Chinese teenagers killed in the Asiana Airlines crash was struck by a fire truck, although it's not clear whether that killed her.

Coroner's officials are still trying to determine the girl's cause of death. But police spokesman Officer Gordon Shyy confirmed Friday that she was hit by the truck.

He says the girl was on the ground and covered in foam that had been sprayed by fire crews.

Asiana Flight 214 collided with a rocky seawall just short of its intended airport runway on Saturday. Two people were killed and dozens of others injured although most suffered minor injuries.

Investigators have said the plane came in too low and slow.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

1 year ago

NTSB: 2 pilots called for Asiana to abort landing

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - Federal investigators say two pilots called for the landing of an Asiana Airlines plane to be aborted seconds before the plane crashed at San Francisco International Airport.

National Transportation Safety Board Chairwoman Deborah Hersman said Thursday the first call to abort was made about three seconds before impact. The second call came about 1.5 seconds later and was made by a different pilot.

Investigators have said the plane came in too low and too slow, clipping a seawall at the edge of the runway. Two people died and 180 of the 307 passengers were hurt.

Hersman also said there was no discussion of the flight's speed during the final approach until about nine seconds before impact.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

Story Photo

1 year ago

Crews begin clearing site of Asiana Flight 214 crash landing

(NBC News) The runway where Asiana Flight 214 crashed last weekend may reopen soon now that the NTSB investigation of the debris field is finished.

9-1-1 calls placed by passengers immediately after the crash were released overnight.

"We're at the SFO airport and our airplane just crashed upon landing, and I think we need some ambulances here as soon as possible," one caller said.

The engines, tail pieces and landing gear have now been removed from the runway; the rest is being picked up and put into containers to be taken to another site for reconstruction.

Read more: http://nbcnews.to/1adJAYY

Story Photo

1 year ago

Asiana passengers called 911 begging for help

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - Emergency calls from people aboard a plane that crashed at San Francisco International Airport portray a scene of chaos, with passengers begging for help and saying ambulances weren't coming fast enough.

The California Highway Patrol released the 911 calls late Wednesday.

One caller tells a 911 dispatcher: "There are no ambulances here. We have been on the ground 20 minutes."

Another tells a dispatcher there's a woman on the runway with severe burns to her head. The caller says, "She will probably die soon if we don't get help."

Asiana Airlines Flight 214 crash-landed Saturday, killing two passengers and injuring many others as it skittered and spun 100 feet.

San Francisco officials say ambulances could not come too close out of concern that the plane would explode.

1 year ago

Asiana plane crash survivors visit wreckage

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - Survivors of the Asiana flight that crashed at San Francisco International Airport have returned to the wreckage site.

Passenger Ben Levy says about 30 survivors and 30 family members visited the site on Wednesday in three buses that left from the hotel where many of them are staying. They were kept about 50 yards away from the wreckage, which is surrounded by metal railing.

Levy says some people cried while others appeared to be in disbelief.

He says he went to the site to meet other passengers and share stories about how they got off the plane and how they are feeling.

The Boeing 777 crashed on Saturday while approaching a runway too low and too slow and hit a rock seawall.

Two of the 307 passengers and crew were killed.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

Story Photo

1 year ago

NTSB chairwoman: No cause of death on crash victim

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - Federal investigators say they have reviewed airport surveillance video to determine whether an emergency vehicle ran over one of the victims of the plane crash at San Francisco International Airport but have not been able to reach any conclusions.

National Transportation Safety Board chairwoman Deborah Hersman on Monday called the possibility that a teenage girl was run over a "very serious issue." She said investigators want to make sure they have all the facts before reaching any conclusions.

Hersman said the coroner has not yet determined the girl's cause of death.

San Francisco Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-White and Assistant Deputy Chief Dale Carnes both said earlier Monday that one of the two teenage girls killed in the crash may have been struck by an emergency vehicle.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

Story Photo

1 year ago

Rescuers describe harrowing scene at plane crash

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - San Francisco fire officials say they encountered smoke, leaking jet fuel and passengers coming down on chutes when they arrived at the Asiana airlines crash scene.

Lt. Christine Emmons said at a news conference on Monday that she and her partner ran up a chute into the plane. They found four passengers trapped in the back.

The conditions in the plane were changing rapidly, with the fire coming down on rescuers and the smoke thickening.

Emmons said the trapped passengers were pulled out to safety.

Asiana Airlines Flight 214 crashed on Saturday at San Francisco International Airport. Two people were killed and more than 180 sent to hospitals.

Story Photo

1 year ago

One runway remains closed this morning at the San Francisco International Airport

Investigators say low air speed was a contributing factor to the weekend Asiana Airlines crash that left two dead and dozens critically injured.

Wreckage from the plane is sitting on the runway way this morning.

A stark reminder of the chaos late saturday morning.

Today investigators will go through the debris piece by piece.

Meanwhile, the plane's black box recording is already offering clues about what went wrong.

They say the black box voice recording from inside the cockpit, captures crews calling for increased speed just seven seconds before the crash.

One and half seconds before impact, the crew unsuccessfully tries to abort the landing.

"We see seconds before the crash on the flight data recorder that they did push those throttles up and try to get some power," says NTSB Chairman, Debbie Hersman.

This morning the National Transportation Safety Board will continue to analyze the damage strewn along runway 28 left, of the San Francisco International Airport.

South Koreas transportation ministry says the pilot was in training to fly boeing triple 7 and less than 50 hours experience flying the plane.

The boeing triple 7 was ending a more than 10 hour flight from Seoul, South Korea.

When witnesses say the plane's tail hit the seawall just beyond the runway and broke off.

Images from the NTSB show rows of seats ripped off their hinges.

Two 16-year-old girls from China were thrown from the plane and killed.

The coroner is investigating whether first responders say they may have run over one of the girls in the chaos.

This morning more than a dozen survivors remain hospitalized, doctors say several are in critical condition.

"The most serious injuries were the combination of abdominal injuries, spine injuries, head injuries, injuries to their extremeties," says Dr. Geoffrey Manley.

Doctors say its a miracle so many survived.

1 year ago

SKorea to inspect Boeing 777s

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) - SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - South Korea says its officials will inspect the engines and landing equipment on all Boeing 777 plans owned by Asiana and Korea Air.

The South Korea government made the announcement today, after Saturday's crash landing of an Asiana flight into San Francisco.

Investigators say the plane was traveling "significantly below" the target speed during its approach and that the crew tried to abort the landing just before it smashed onto the runway.

1 year ago

New information on Asiana plane crash

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - Officials investigating a jetliner crash in San Francisco have determined the Boeing 777 was traveling "significantly below" its target speed as it approached the airport.

The officials say the Asiana jetliner crew tried to abort the landing just before the plane smashed onto the runway. What they don't yet know is why, and whether the pilot's inexperience with this type of aircraft and this airport may have played a role.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

1 year ago

Asiana says pilot had little experience on 777s

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) - Asiana Airlines says the pilot in control of the Boeing 777 that crashed in San Francisco had little experience flying that type of plane and was landing one for the first time at that airport.

Asiana spokeswoman Lee Hyomin said Monday that Lee Gang-guk was trying to get used to the 777 during Saturday's crash landing. She says the pilot had nearly 10,000 hours flying other planes but had only 43 hours on the 777.

Accident investigators are trying to determine whether pilot error, mechanical problems or something else was to blame for the crash.

The head of the National Transportation Safety Board said earlier that the pilots were flying too slowly as they approached the airport and tried to abort the landing but crashed barely a second later.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

1 year ago

Official probes if rescuers ran over crash victim

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - A San Francisco-area coroner whose office received the bodies of two teenage victims of the Asiana plane crash says officials are conducting an autopsy to determine if one of the girls was run over and killed by a rescue vehicle.

San Mateo County Coroner Robert Foucrault says Sunday that senior San Francisco Fire Department officials notified him and his staff at the crash site on Saturday that one of the 16-year-olds may have been struck on the runaway.

Foucrault says an autopsy he expects to be completed by Monday will involve determining whether the girl's death was caused by injuries suffered in the crash or "a secondary incident."

He says he did not get a close enough look at the victims on Saturday to know whether they had external injuries.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

1 year ago

Official: Asiana flight tried to abort landing

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - A federal safety official says the cockpit voice recorder from Asiana Airlines Flight 214 showed the jetliner tried to abort its landing and come around for another try 1.5 seconds before it crashed at San Francisco airport.

National Transportation Safety Board chief Deborah Hersman says at a news conference Sunday the recorder also showed there was a call to increase airspeed roughly two seconds before impact.

Before that, she says, there was no indication in the recordings that the aircraft was having any problems.

The jetliner carrying 307 people crashed Saturday, killing two passengers and injuring dozens of other people.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

Story Photo

1 year ago

Coroner: Asiana Airlines crash victims were 16-year-old girls

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - Authorities say the two passengers who died in Saturday's crash of an Asiana Airlines flight at San Francisco International Airport were 16-year-old girls from China.

San Mateo County Coroner Robert Foucrault told the San Jose Mercury News that (http://bit.ly/153cW8X ) one appeared to have been thrown from the rear of the plane when the tail broke off, and the other was found near the wreckage.

The official Chinese news agency Xinhua, quoting the Chinese Consulate in San Francisco, says both victims were from China.

Education authorities in China say at least 70 Chinese students and teachers were on the plane heading to summer camps.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

1 year ago

NTSB eyes lack of landing tool in air crash

WASHINGTON (AP) - An aviation safety official says accident investigators are looking into what role the shutdown of a key navigational aid may have played in the San Francisco plane crash.

National Transportation Safety Board Chairman Deborah Hersman says the glide slope - a ground-based aid that helps pilots stay on course while landing - had been shut down since June.

She says pilots were sent a notice warning that the glide slope wasn't available.

Hersman tells CBS' "Face the Nation" that there were many other navigation tools available to help pilots land. She says investigators will be "taking a look at it all."

The Asiana Airlines plane crashed as it was about to land Saturday, breaking off its tail and catching fire.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

Story Photo

1 year ago

Fire chief: All accounted for from SF plane crash

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - San Francisco's fire chief says authorities have accounted for all the passengers and crew members who were about the jetliner that crashed at San Francisco International Airport.

Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-White said that as of Saturday evening the more than 300 people who were aboard Asiana Flight 411 had been located at either hospitals or the airport.

Earlier Saturday, Hayes-White had reported that authorities did not know where "upwards of 60" people were after the crash.

She says the confusion stemmed from survivors being brought from the wreckage from two different locations.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

1 year ago

Obama grateful to first responders at jet crash

WASHINGTON (AP) - President Barack Obama is expressing his gratitude to the first responders at the scene of the airliner crash in San Francisco.

An Asiana Airlines flight from South Korea crashed while landing at San Francisco International Airport on Saturday. Authorities are trying to determine how many have died and how many have been injured in the crash.

The White House says in a statement that Obama has directed his team to stay in constant contact with federal, state and local partners as they investigate and respond to the accident.

The White House says the president's thoughts and prayers go out to the families of those affected by the crash.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

Story Photo

1 year ago

Fire Chief: 2 dead in San Francisco airport crash

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - San Francisco Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-White says that there are two dead in the crash of an Asiana jetliner at San Francisco International Airport.

She also said several passengers were unaccounted for. She said, "This is a work in progress."

She said that the scene has been secured and has been turned over to the FBI. Terrorism has been ruled out.

She said at least 48 people were initially transported from the scene to area hospitals.

The Federal Aviation Administration said Flight 214 crashed while landing at 11:36 a.m. PDT. A video clip posted to YouTube showed smoke coming from a jet on the tarmac. Passengers could be seen jumping down the emergency slides.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

Story Photo

1 year ago

Official: 10 injured in San Francisco plane crash

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - San Francisco General Hospital says it is treating eight adults and two children who were critically injured in a plane crash at San Francisco International Airport.

Hospital spokeswoman Rachael Kagan says the adult patients range in age from 20 to their 40s. It was not immediately clear the ages of the children.

San Francisco-area broadcasters KNTV, KCBS and KTVU have reported that there were fatalities in Saturday's crash of the Asiana airlines flight from Seoul, South Korea.

But The Associated Press contacted police, fire and coroner's officials and was unable to confirm any deaths.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

Story Photo

1 year ago

NTSB launches team to investigate airline crash

WASHINGTON (AP) - The National Transportation Safety Board says it's sending a team of investigators to San Francisco to investigate the crash of an Asiana airliner.

NTSB spokeswoman Kelly Nantel said Saturday that NTSB Chairman Deborah Hersman would head the team.

Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman Laura Brown said the Flight 214 from Seoul to San Francisco crashed while landing on runway 28 left at San Francisco International Airport. Brown said the crash occurred at 11:26 PDT.

.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

1 year ago

UPDATE: FAA: Airliner crashes on landing in San Francisco

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - An Asiana Airlines flight from Seoul, South Korea, crashed while landing at San Francisco International Airport on Saturday, forcing passengers to jump down the emergency inflatable slides to safety. It was not immediately known whether there were any injuries.

Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman Laura Brown said the Boeing 777 was supposed to land on runway 28 left at the airport. She said the sequence of events was still unclear, but it appeared the plane landed and then crashed.

A video clip posted to YouTube shows smoke coming from a silver-colored jet on the tarmac. Passengers could be seen jumping down the inflatable emergency slides. Television footage showed debris strewn about the tarmac and pieces of the plane lying on the runway.

Fire trucks had sprayed a white fire retardant on the wreckage.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

Story Photo

1 year ago

FAA: Airliner crashes on landing in San Francisco

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - Federal aviation officials say an Asiana Airlines flight from Seoul, South Korea, has crashed while landing at San Francisco airport. It was not immediately known whether there were any injuries.

Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman Laura Brown says the plane was coming from South Korea and was supposed to land on runway 28 left at San Francisco International Airport. She said the sequence of events was still unclear, but it appeared the plane landed and then crashed.

A video clip posted to YouTube shows smoke coming from a silver-colored jet on the tarmac. Passengers could be seen jumping down the inflatable emergency slides.

The airline's website says its Boeing 777 can carry between 246 to 300 passengers.

___

Associated Press writer Joan Lowy in Washington, D.C., contributed to this report.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

1 year ago

FAA: Airliner crashes on landing in San Francisco

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - A federal aviation official says an Asiana Airlines flight has crashed while landing at San Francisco airport. It was not immediately known whether there were any injuries.

Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Lynn Lunsford says the Boeing 777 crashed at San Francisco Airport while landing on Saturday.

A video clip posted to Youtube shows smoke coming from a silver-colored jet on the tarmac. Passengers could be seen jumping down the inflatable emergency slides.

The airline is based in Seoul, South Korea. Its website says its Boeing 777 can carry between 246 to 300 passengers.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

Story Photo

1 year ago

FAA: Airliner crashes on landing in San Francisco

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - A federal aviation official says an Asiana Airlines flight has crashed while landing at San Francisco airport. It was not immediately known whether there were any injuries.

Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman Lynn Lunsford says the Boeing 777 crashed at San Francisco Airport while landing on Saturday.

A video clip posted to Youtube shows smoke coming from a silver-colored jet on the tarmac. Passengers could be seen jumping down the inflatable emergency slides.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Photo
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail
  • Story Thumbnail

»Comments

PLEASE HELP US MODERATE COMMENTS

Offensive or inappropriate comments are subject to removal. To report a comment, please e-mail us at feedback@ksby.com, and include the name of the story and information on the comment.

Thank you! KSBY.com


Comments

Most Popular

Top Videos

1 2 3 4