H-SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY

Feb 14, 2013 1:33 PM by Dan Shadwell

"It Started with a Red Thread" connects new exhibits at SLO Museum of Art

When you consider the periods of art--Renaissance, Romanticism, Contemporary, and Modern, it's true that the pieces defining each time frame may differ immensely, but they'll also be linked by a common style or idea.
In today's Local Spotlight... two new exhibits at the SLO Museum of Art, quite literally share a common thread.
"It Started with a Red Thread" sprang from a group of 10 female artists who've been meeting weekly for forty years.
When one of them produced a work made from the pages of the book, "Little Women," the other members decided to add their own chapters.
"The first artist was inspired by Kate Froman's book jacket and the next artist was inspired by her and so on," explains Ruta Saliklis, the museum's director of exhibits. "So, it's kind of like this game of telephone almost," she says.
If you were to wander the gallery and examine the works out of order, you might not catch the link. But starting with Froman's work, then progressing down the line, you begin to see how each builds on the former.
"It could be just a color, it could be a shape," says Saliklis, pointing to red thread woven through the first several works. "It could be that one is working in quilting, so there's a geometric grid form."
That grid takes a three dimensional form in the next cubist-type work, which in turn leads to a metal sculpture.
A second exhibit downstairs shares that yarn. "Lines I Shadows" features the work of Juline Beier. Her wall hangings and bowl-shaped forms are composed of threads holding a rigid form, resembling the texture you might see in a furnace filter.
"It just made sense to also have other fibre artists at the same time," Saliklis says.
Juline Beier starts these pieces by sewing on a water-soluble paper membrane.
"...and she takes the sewing machine and stitches all over it," Saliklis explains, "...and then puts that in water. So essentially, the fabric it was on, disappears."
That leaves a sort of skeleton of shaped, woven framework behind.... some of which almost seem to resist gravity.
The SLO Museum of Art is located downtown at 1010 Broad Street and there's no admission charge, so it's easy to stop in and take a look while you're out for a stroll.
For more information on the current exhibits, and to see what lies ahead, just go to ksby.com and click on "links."

When you consider the periods of art--Renaissance, Romanticism, Contemporary, and Modern, it's true that the pieces defining each time frame may differ immensely, but they'll also be linked by a common style or idea.
In today's Local Spotlight... two new exhibits at the SLO Museum of Art, quite literally share a common thread.
"It Started with a Red Thread" sprang from a group of 10 female artists who've been meeting weekly for forty years.
When one of them produced a work made from the pages of the book, "Little Women," the other members decided to add their own chapters.
"The first artist was inspired by Kate Froman's book jacket and the next artist was inspired by her and so on," explains Ruta Saliklis, the museum's director of exhibits. "So, it's kind of like this game of telephone almost," she says.
If you were to wander the gallery and examine the works out of order, you might not catch the link. But starting with Froman's work, then progressing down the line, you begin to see how each builds on the former.
"It could be just a color, it could be a shape," says Saliklis, pointing to red thread woven through the first several works. "It could be that one is working in quilting, so there's a geometric grid form."
That grid takes a three dimensional form in the next cubist-type work, which in turn leads to a metal sculpture.
A second exhibit downstairs shares that yarn. "Lines I Shadows" features the work of Juline Beier. Her wall hangings and bowl-shaped forms are composed of threads holding a rigid form, resembling the texture you might see in a furnace filter.
"It just made sense to also have other fibre artists at the same time," Saliklis says.
Juline Beier starts these pieces by sewing on a water-soluble paper membrane.
"...and she takes the sewing machine and stitches all over it," Saliklis explains, "...and then puts that in water. So essentially, the fabric it was on, disappears."
That leaves a sort of skeleton of shaped, woven framework behind.... some of which almost seem to resist gravity.
The SLO Museum of Art is located downtown at 1010 Broad Street and there's no admission charge, so it's easy to stop in and take a look while you're out for a stroll.
For more information on the current exhibits, and to see what lies ahead, just go to ksby.com and click on "links."

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