NewsNational NewsScripps News

Actions

USDA warns some ready-to-eat salads, wraps may contain deer feces

Five different kinds of premade salads and wraps were affected due to contaminated lettuce.
USDA warns some ready-to-eat salads, wraps may contain deer feces
Posted at 9:18 AM, Aug 10, 2023

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service issued a public health alert this week warning that some ready-to-eat salads and wraps may contain lettuce contaminated with deer feces. 

The Food Safety and Inspection Service said there have not been any reported illnesses from the products. Officials said the problem was discovered when an establishment notified the Food Safety and Inspection Service that its lettuce supplier was issuing a recall. 

There were five different products affected, the Food Safety and Inspection Service said. Those products include:

- 8.65-oz. plastic film packages containing “Chicken Caesar Wrap FRESH SEASONS Kitchen” with lot code 21323 and 21423 and Sell By dates of 8/9/2023 and 8/10/2023.

- 7.2-oz. plastic film packages containing “Chicken Caesar Wrap FRESH SEASONS Kitchen” with lot code 21323 and Fresh Thru date of 8/10/2023.

- 8.5-oz. plastic clam shell packages containing “Chicken Caesar Salad FRESH SEASONS Kitchen” with lot code 21323 and Fresh Thru date of 8/9/2023.

- 8.55-oz. plastic clam shell packages containing “Chef Salad FRESH SEASONS Kitchen” with lot codes 21323 and 21423 and Sell By dates of 8/9/2023 and 8/10/2023.

- 5.85-oz. plastic clam shell packages containing “Bacon, Lettuce and Tomato Salad FRESH SEASONS Kitchen” with lot codes 21323 and 21423 and Sell By dates of 8/9/2023 and 8/10/2023.

SEE MORE: Mosquitos carrying infectious diseases are becoming harder to kill

Consumers with these products are urged not to consume them. 

Officials have said in the past that deer feces can cause illnesses in humans. In 2011, an E. coli outbreak was linked to strawberries contaminated with deer feces. Officials said 15 people became ill eating the contaminated strawberries. 


Trending stories at Scrippsnews.com