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Queen Elizabeth II has died: Now, what happens to her beloved dogs?

Her Majesty has owned more than 30 Welsh corgis.
BRITAIN G20 PALACE
Posted at 1:26 PM, Sep 08, 2022
and last updated 2022-09-08 16:26:21-04

Queen Elizabeth II was a known dog lover, calling more than 30 Welsh corgis her own over the years.

Her beloved dogs were even able to achieve a level of fame, with one of the corgis named Holly appearing in a James Bond sketch during London's 2012 Olympics during the Opening Ceremonies, according to England's Daily News.

A royal biographer told Newsweek, "She loves animals and she absolutely adores dogs. She always has done, they were her first love and they will be her last," Ingrid Seward said before Her Majesty died.

Queen Elizabeth II died on Thursday at 96-years-old after senior members of her royal family headed to Balmoral in Scotland to be with her in her final moments on Earth.

So what will happen to the Queen's pets now? That was a question many were asking.

According to Newsweek, who spoke to royal biographers, it's not entirely clear exactly how many dogs she had when she died. It is believed she had about four dogs. Two of those dogs are corgis named Muick and Sandy, according to reports.

Others included a Dorgi named Candy and another two Cocker Spaniels.

There wasn't a statement released to the public immediately after the Queen's death detailing a plan for the dogs, but it is believed that they should be bequeathed to her children.

Seward said, "I imagine the dogs would be looked after by the family, probably Andrew, as he's the one that gave them to her. They're quite young, the corgi and the dorgi."

Another theory came from Penny Junor, an author.

She said, "Care of the dogs has fallen sometimes to footmen but mostly to the Queen's trusted dressmaker, assistant, and right-hand woman, Angela Kelly. And to her equally trusted page of many years standing, Paul Whybrew, who was seen walking with the Queen and the dogs in the James Bond spoof."

Junor detailed the theory in her 2018 book, "All the Queen's Corgis."