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Parole agents conduct Operation Boo in SLO to keep sex offenders from kids during Halloween

Posted at 10:44 PM, Oct 31, 2018
and last updated 2018-11-01 11:30:51-04

For 25 years, “Operation Boo” has worked to keep children safe from sex offenders.

On Wednesday, the Department of Corrections conducted checks on 20 offenders in the San Luis Obispo area.

On Halloween, a temporary Special Condition of Parole is imposed. Offenders are prohibited from leaving their residence between the hours of 5 p.m. October 31 and 5 a.m. November 1. Transients must remain located at their camp location.

While their kids celebrate Halloween, Agent Manuel Olivas and Agent Roger Monteiro worked to protect the most vulnerable filling their bags with goodies.

“If we weren’t out here doing this, these guys knew we weren’t out contacting them, I think it would be easier to for them to commit a crime or re-offend,” Olivas said.

Two teams from the Division of Parole Operations followed the GPS monitoring of the offenders, checking if they were in compliance with the number of conditions.

Offenders are not allowed to answer the door should any trick-or-treaters call. All exterior lights must remain off during the instructed hours. They cannot possess or distribute quantities of candy that may be used for participating in Halloween celebration. They are also not allowed to wear or possess any costumes. Decorations are also prohibited.

Some of the offenders are homeless, living in hotel rooms, or out of their vehicles.

“Lot of these guys come out with not a lot of resources and as a sex offender, there are not a lot of resources out there,” Olivas said.

Only two on the list were women. The night ended in zero arrests. All 20 were compliant.

“Keeping kids safe, that’s what it is all about,” Olivas said.

90 sex offenders are on parole throughout San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties.

The U.S. Department of Justice says most sex-abuse against kids is committed by people they know and trust.  30 percent of all child molesters are the children’s own family members. About 60 percent aren’t family members — but they are known to the child. They’re family friends, babysitters, child care providers, or neighbors. Roughly 10 percent of molestation cases involve strangers abducting and abusing children.